Requirements of Hiring Employees in Denmark

Contract of hiring employees in Denmark

Agreements between an employer and employee are commonly used as the employment contract, but employers are required to provide a written contract explaining the benefits provided to the employees and the working conditions.

Immigration Requirements

Individuals who are not citizens of Nordic countries or the EU/EEA must apply for a work permit before arriving in Denmark.

HR & Labor

Working hours: Employees are limited to working 48 hours. including overtime, within a 7-day period.

Minimum working age:: Individuals under 15 years old can only work 12 hours a week while attending school and 35 hours while on vacation. A break must be provided every 4.5 consecutive hours of work to employees under 18 years of age, and they cannot work the night shift.

Payroll

Employees are paid on a monthly basis, with paydays being either at the end of the month or on the 15th of each month.

The information contained in this article is valid on November 27th, 2018. For updated information, please contact us via email at contact@nnroad.com.

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Social Security in Denmark

Social Security Deductions in Denmark

When hiring employees in Denmark, Employment law sustains that the Danish social security system is financed primarily through ordinary tax revenue and requires very limited social security contributions for employees and employers. All individuals working in Denmark and fully tax liable to Denmark and who are covered by Danish social security must also pay labor market supplementary pension (ATP).

Danish social security contributions are deductible from personal income for tax purposes. The employer is responsible for withholding and paying the contributions on behalf of their employees on an annual basis.

Annual contribution rates in Denmark

Danish labour market supplementary pension fund (ATP):  DKK 1,135.80  of employee’s annual gross salary.

Maternity fund: n/a

Industrial injuries insurance: n/a*

Other public social security schemes: n/a

*Note:

  • Estimated industrial injuries insurance may vary, depending on the field of work that the insured employee is employed within, the number of employees that the employer intends to insure, the specific insurance company, etc.

Danish labour market supplementary pension fund (ATP): DKK 2,271.60 of employee’s annual gross salary.

Maternity fund:DKK 950

Industrial injuries insurance: DKK 5,000*

Other public social security schemes: DKK 5,300

*Note:

  • *Estimated industrial injuries insurance may vary, depending on the field of work that the insured employee is employed within, the number of employees that the employer intends to insure, the specific insurance company, etc.

Individual Income Tax & Benefits in Denmark

Individuals who are Danish residents or who have had Danish source income are obliged to file an annual Danish tax return. Individuals are taxed based on the ordinary tax scheme below.

Personal income tax rates:

Denmark individual income tax rates

The following deductions are allowed as it applies to each individual:

Charitable contributions: Donations to certain approved charities, foundations, institutions, etc. are deductible in the determination of taxable income. The maximum deductible amount per year is DKK 15,900.

Child benefits: A tax-free child benefit of DKK 11,232 per annum is payable to the custodial parent of children aged 7 to 14 if the parent is fully tax liable to Denmark and is not covered by the social security system in the home country. The annual benefit for children aged 0 to 2 is DKK 18,024 and for children aged 3 to 6 is DKK 14,268 and is paid on a quarterly basis. For children aged 15 to 17, the amount is DKK 3,744 per year. An individual who pays child support maintenance because of divorce is entitled to an annual deduction per child.

Association expenses: A taxpayer can deduct expenses incurred for quotas for membership of employer associations, unions, and other professional associations that aim to defend the economic interests of the professional group to which the taxpayer falls.

In Denmark, personal allowances are referred to as tax credits. A personal allowance of DKK 46,000 is granted to all individuals over the age of 18. For individuals under the age of 18, the personal allowance is DKK 34,500. The personal allowance leads to a reduction of income tax.

The standard VAT rate in Denmark is 25%.

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Employee Termination Policies in Denmark

For salaried employees or employees covered by a collective agreement, the employer must provide a justified reason in order to terminate the employment contract. The notice period of termination is as follows:

Denmark Termination policy

Severance Pay

In the case of a salaried employee having worked for the same company for over 12 years or in the case of an employee’s dismissal for economic reasons, the employee is entitled to the following severance pay scheme:

• 1 month’s salary, if the employee has more than 12 years of seniority at the time of expiration of the notice period,

• 2 months’ salary, if the employee has more than 15 years of seniority at the time of expiration of the notice period, and

• 3 months’ salary, if the employee has more than 18 years of seniority at the time of expiration of the notice period.

Probationary Period in Germany

There are no laws regarding probationary periods in Denmark. However, a probationary period of up to three months may be agreed upon and the period cannot be extended. During the probationary period both the employer and employee are entitled to terminate the employment contract by giving 14 days of notice.

Rest & Holiday Leaves in Denmark

When hiring employees in Denmark, Employment law sustains that Employees have the right to five weeks of paid holiday leave if they have worked an entire calendar year leading up to the holiday year (1 May to 30 April). If an employee has been employed for less than a full calendar year, he earns 2.08 days per month of employment.

New Year’s Day – January 1

Maundy Thursday – March 29 

Good Friday – March 30 

Easter Sunday – April 1

Easter Monday – April 2

Great Day of Prayers – Fourth Friday after Easter 

Ascension Day – Fortieth day after Easter

Pentecost – Fiftieth day after Easter

Whit Monday – Day after Pentecost

Christmas Day – December 25

Second Day of Christmas Day – December 26

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2019-04-29T08:10:42-03:00November 27th, 2018|Hiring Employees Guides|